66c: Public Welfare
66c:1 First Municipal Aid to Unemployed
66c:2 General Government Work
66c:3 Unemployment and Relief
66c:4 Civil Works Administration--City Annual Report 1933
66c:5 Milk for the Unemployed
66c:6 Unemployment and Relief
66c:7 Scrip Issue for City's Needy Suggested
66c:8 C.W.A.--Federal Funds Requested
66c:9 C.W.A.--Women to Be Employed
66c:10-11 C.W.A.--List of Projected Planned
66c:12 C.W.A.--Council Approves Five Projects
66c:13 C.W.A.--School Board Uses 78 Workers
66c:14 C.W.A.--Citizens Voice Disapproval
66c:15 Civil Works Administration--City Annual Report 1934
66c:16-17 Federal Relief Projects--City Annual Report 1935
66c:18 Boiler and Laundry Building at the Lakewood City Hospital (1935)
66c:19 W.P.A. Projects--City Annual Report 1936
66c:20 Boiler and Laundry Building at the Lakewood City Hospital (1936)
66c:21 Costs of W.P.A. Work (Estimated)
66c:22 Relief Load Assumed by Local Subdivisions
66c:23 W.P.A. Projects--City Annual Report 1937
66c:24 Costs and Activities
66c:25 P.W.A. Projects--City Annual Report 1938
66c:26 W.P.A. Projects--City Annual Report 1938
66c:27 W.P.A. Projects--City Annual Report 1938

 


66c:1

FIRST MUNICIPAL AID TO UNEMPLOYED
ANNUAL REPORT OF CITY OF LAKEWOOD – 1932 pp. 7-8

The Lakewood Sewing Circle and the First Church of Christ, Scientist through the able leadership of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gibson, inaugurated and conducted the furnishing of milk and bread to the unemployed. Hundreds of gallons of milk was furnished by the Ohio Farmers Milk Service, Inc. and hundreds of loaves of bread were furnished by the Spang Baking Company and the General Baking Company, all free of cost. This milk and bread was distributed from election booths on Warren Road and at the Madison Park Shelter House and was a God-send to many unemployed people and the city is greatly indebted to the Lakewood Sewing Circle, the First Church of Christ, Scientist, to those who donated milk and bread, and especially to Mr. and Mrs. Gibson, for their untiring efforts and management in the distribution of these products.

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66c:2

GENERAL GOVERNMENT WORK
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD – 1932 p. 34

The program submitted by Lakewood was in excess of $2,400,000 on the statement by the Federal authorities that our share should be $2,100,000.

The program included improvements to the sewage treatment plant, a city garage, new cell block and garage at the Police Station, swimming pool in Madison Park, breakwater at Lakewood Park, Grandstand in Madison park, bandstand and comfort station in Lakewood Park, street intersection widenings, relief sewers, storm sewer spillways into Lake Erie, tree trimming and general sidewalk repairs.

In anticipation of the government's requirements for sponsor or city contributions, councilmanic bonds for $75,000 were sold and this together with money from gas tax and other non-general tax sources was thought sufficient for the program.

The Federal Government generally has approved for this city only small individual projects for which the city has had funds for a portion or the whole cost of materials, the government furnishing the labor cost.

Unfinished work to be carried into 1936 is the tennis courts in Lakewood Park, tennis courts in Wagar Park, and seven street intersections.

While we have not realized our whole work program there are indications that it will carry on until July, 1936, and possibly longer. If so, many of the projects which have not yet been approved will receive approval in order to take up all employable persons on relief.

This city has had the distinction of having a continuous work program even before the inception of C.W.A. and except for a complete shut-down between the close of F.E.R.A. and the opening of W.P.A. the federal aid program has been in continuous operation. This is attributed to the fact that the Mayor has insisted on only useful work being done and the Federal Government has recognized this conformity to its ideal.

In addition to the preparation of plans, estimates and engineering supervision of these works, this division has carried on the requirements of general engineering for other divisions and departments and heretofore.

Respectfully submitted.
E.A. Fisher, City Engineer.
 

 

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66c:3


UNEMPLOYMENT and RELIEF
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1933 p. 5

As stated, the unemployment and relief conditions during the year 1933 were more acute than at any time to date. The relief load of the City of Lakewood for 1933 was approximately $83,000.00 This included groceries, fuel, rents, room and board, medical services and some relief work. More relief work could have been done were it not for the fact that the funds did not permit. Of the amount expended for poor relief purposes, approximately $70,000.00 was diverted from gasoline tax funds. This diversion, in order to meet the poor relief problem, reduced employment in street repair to that extent and it was a question that could not be handled to any better advantage as there are many cases where persons are unable to perform work and the big item in the relief work was the purchase of groceries and other commodities for those out of employment.

 

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66c:4

CIVIL WORKS ADMINISTRATION
ANNUAL REPORT OF CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1933 pp. 5-6

In November, 1933, the Federal Government instituted what was known as the Civil Works Administration program and because of this we obtained a great deal of relief by employment of a great many men. When the Civil Works Administration was first instituted applications were made for certain projects and the Federal Government paid for the labor and approximately 10 per cent of the material required on such projects. This program continued until March 31, 1934, and was really not in full operation during the year 1933. Because of this federal aid we furnished employment for a great many men and were successful in having work done without cost to the city for labor among such projects being the following:

Grading and landscaping a portion of Lakewood Dump and moving the fence towards the lake increasing the park space.
The installation of a new water line from the Detroit Avenue car-barns to the Sewage Disposal Plant.
Landscaping and draining at the Incinerator grounds.
Elimination of the open ditch in Lakewood Park by installing a concrete culvert which has increased park space and eliminated hazardous and insanitary conditions.
The widening of Edgewater Drive 6 feet on the south side from Cove to Highland Avenues.
Cleaning up, removing underbrush and grading the grounds on the Sewage Disposal plant property in Rocky River Valley.
The grading and Cindering of Detroit Ally, Riverside Alley and Cannon Alley.
The trimming of street trees. While this was not a complete trimming of trees we were successful in going over practically the entire city and trimmed trees to a certain degree.
The construction of three tennis courts in Madison Park.
The widening of Hilliard Road on the north side from Warren Road to Madison Avenue 4 feet and on the south side from Victoria to Mars Avenue.
The widening of Woodward Avenue intersection at Detroit Avenue.
The widening of Franklin Boulevard 8 feet on the south side from Lakewood Avenue to Warren Road and on the north side from St. Charles to Wyandotte Avenues.

These projects were not all completed in the year 1933, but extended into the year 1934. At the conclusion of the Civil Works Administration program, March 31, 1934, some of these projects were taken over and are to be continued as Federal Works Relief Administration projects.

 

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66c:5


MILK FOR THE UNEMPLOYED
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1933 pg. 7

During the fall of 1932 the Lakewood Sewing Circle and the First Church of Christ, Scientist, through the able leadership of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gibson, inaugurated and conducted the furnishing of bread and milk to the unemployed. This continued until the early spring of 1933 when it was discontinued but during this period thousands of gallons of milk was furnished by the Ohio Farmers Milk Service, Incorporated and hundreds of loaves of bread were furnished by the Spang Baking Company and the General Baking Company all free of cost and arrangements were made to have the milk and bread called for without any expense.

 

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66c:6

UNEMPLOYMENT AND RELIEF
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1933 p. 30

The daily cleaning, picking up rubbish, papers, in the parks, etc., was accomplished by the aid of the Associated Charities workers, who were given fifty cents additional on their daily allowances for each day worked. This arrangement was most unsatisfactory, because of the small compensation it was not expected that any efficiency or real amount of work could be obtained.

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66c:7

SCRIP ISSUE FOR CITY'S NEEDY SUGGESTED
LAKEWOOD COURIER - February 9, 1933 p. 1

A suggestion that Lakewood issue script for the $13,000 it expects to receive from the gas tax fund for poor relief, was made at Lakewood council Monday night by H.A. Barr.

Barr said the needy should be given script for work done on city projects so that some part of the money will be returned to local independent merchants. At present the money is turned over to the Associated Charities, and most of it spent in chain food stores, Barr said.

Barr said heads of indigent families here would welcome the opportunity to earn some money instead of being on a dole. Councilman Darmstatter supported Barr's suggestion, saying that he believed independent merchants should get more consideration than the chain stores.

Mayor Kauffman pointed out that many families, now receiving aid from the city, have no member able to work. In several of the families the husband is dead, the mayor said.

It was pointed out that some of the chain stores allowed the Associated Charities to pile up large bills, larger than the small merchant could carry.

The suggestion was referred to the committee on taxation.

 

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66c:8

C. W. A.
(Federal Funds requested)
LAKEWOOD COURIER - November 23, 1933 p. 1

$11,946 was Lakewood's request made for C.W.A. funds, by Mayor Kauffman, when he met with federal representatives at Columbus, Sunday.

The meeting was a result of the conference of all the Mayors of the county commissioners' office, last Friday, at which time a report was made of the conference between Mayor Davis, A.V. Cannon, chairman of Cuyahoga County Relief Commission, and David S. Ingall's, Cleveland's new welfare director, with President Roosevelt and Mr. Hopkins at Washington. These representatives requested the president for C.W.A. funds with which to put men to work in Cuyahoga County between November 16th and December 1st.

Mayor Kauffman indicated that funds asked for Lakewood's share, would be used to divert the sewer chamber at Madison Avenue and Lewis Drive; to eliminate the open ditch in Lakewood Park; to grade and landscape a portion of the city dump, and to reallocate the fence and enlarge the park; for landscaping and drainage work at the incinerator plant on Berea Road; and for grading and landscaping the sewer disposal property.

Final approval of the request is expected this week.

 

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66c:9

C. W. A.
(Women to be Employed)
LAKEWOOD COURIER - November 30, 1933 p. 1

Twenty-one women will be given employment in Lakewood under the C.W.A., Superintendent Julius Warren reported to the school board at their meeting Monday night. He had made the report of the needs of the board Friday at the request of Mr. Beggs, chairman of the Cleveland C.W.A.

Superintendent Warren said that five of the women would be used as librarians and the remainder would be used in clerical work.

The women will be used to clean up work that has piled up at the board office, at the high school and at the junior highs. This work needs to be done, but it has been deferred because of the stress of our financial condition.

“The C.W.A. will pay the entire cost of this labor for the 9-week period,” he pointed out. “The C.W.A. is an outright grant of the federal government for the relief of unemployment. And there are a number of women in Lakewood who need this employment.”

The superintendent also suggested to the board that there sas about $11,000 worth of labor that could be done, with the federal aid of C.W.A..on painting of the schools. A survey of the conditions of the school playgrounds was made Monday and some men could be used on cleaning up these plots.

 

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66c:10-11

C. W. A.
(List of Projects Planned)
LAKEWOOD COURIER - December 7, 1933 p. 1

If the present plans are carried out, Lakewood will soon have nearly 500 men and women employed under the CWA.

Ed Sargent, city street commissioner, listed the following projects that have been approved by the state CWA and are now in operation.

The ditch elimination in Lakewood Park, employing 10 men; landscaping and cleaning up at the city incinerator, employing six men.

Mr. Sargent also told of a number of other projects that are now being prepared, and as soon as approved by the state CWA, will provide employment far from 300 to 350 additional workers.

Practically all of these proposed projects were presented by the mayor to the city council Monday night, and received the endorsement of that body.

The largest of these projects is the widening of the following streets: Woodward Avenue, on both sides for 200 feet or more from Detroit Avenue; the south side of Edgewater Drive, from Cove Avenue to West 117th street; the west side of Cove Avenue, from Lake Avenue to Edgewater Drive, and the north side of Hilliard Road from Warren Road to Madison Avenue. There is also a possibility that Franklin Avenue may also be widened. Mr. Sargent estimated that from 200 to 250 men could be employed in doing this work.

The CWA has already approved the installing of a flow chamber in the storm sewer at the corner of Lewis Drive and Madison Avenue, and this project will be started just as soon as the street car company lays temporary tracks for its cars to use while the improvement is being made. This project will provide employment for seven men.

There is also the re-allocation of the four-inch water line from the top of the hill to the sewage disposal plant, which when started will give work to fifty men.

The following alleys and drives will be widened and graveled with CWA help: Cannon alley, employing 10 men; Riverside Alley, employing 20 men; Andrews lane, employing 10 men; and St. Charles lane, employing eight men.

There is a possibility that some CWA workers may be used to build tennis courts and landscape Madison Park, providing the necessary funds are available to purchase materials.

Engineer Fisher points out that while the CWA pays the entire cost of labor, it pays only 10 per cent of the cost for any materials needed. Because of the limited budget, it is impossible for Lakewood to proceed with many projects that should be done if the funds were but available.

That conditions are improving is shown in the report of Mr. Sargent, which shows that early in the fall Lakewood had many men on its list of street relief workers. This list is now only slightly over 350 and Mr. Sargent says that practically all of those who have withdrawn their names from the list have done so because they have found steady employment.

Mr. Sargent has instructed all of the men on this list to register at the city employment bureau, as all CWA workers are chosen by state CWA from this list. The former system of providing employment for local needy was by hiring men for two or three days per month for street relief work. Practically all such work now uses only CWA employed laborers.

Under the CWA men are employed five days per week, at six hours per day, but they cannot work more than 120 hours in a month. They are paid by the federal government at the rate of 50 cents per hour. The CWA will probably be discontinued in February.

The Lakewood Board of Education reported last week that they would employ 21 women for clerical and librarian work under the CWA.

 

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66c:12

C.W.A.
(Council Approves Five Projects)
LAKEWOOD COURIER - December 14, 1933 p. 1

At a special meeting of the city council Monday night, additional CWA projects submitted by Mayor Kauffman were approved. When these projects have received the sanction of the state CWA board, it will make it possible for Lakewood to put 736 men to work with this federal aid.

Administration officials agreed with members of the council that every effort should be made to find additional projects until upward to 2,000 local men can be employed. Council President Phillips named the following committee to list additional projects and to submit them to the Mayor for consideration: Councilman Gormsen, Spanur, and Myers, and Councilmen-elect Lintz end Dawson.

There are 70 men working under the CWA for the city of Lakewood at the present time.

The CWA projects approved by the council Monday night, include -- the trimming of trees, which will employ 25 men for a period of 60 days; the excavating and draining of the skating pond in Madison Park, which will use 37 men for 30 days; the grading and laying of drains and putting in cinders for three tennis courts in Madison Park, which will employ 10 men for 26 days; the painting of brick work at the fire station No.1, and on the Municipal Hospital Building, which will use 15 men for 20 days; and one bookkeeper and one stenographer to take care of the necessary extra work at the city hall.

The council passed a resolution permitting the administration to rent large trucks whenever necessary at the CWA price of $2.50 per hour.

Mayor Kauffman indicated that the project of building a breakwater along Lakewood's waterfront was under consideration by the city engineer department as a future CWA project.

 

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66c:13

C. W. A.
(School Board Uses 78 Workers)
LAKEWOOD COURIER - December 21, 1933 p. 1

A total of 78 additional people have been put to work with the CWA aid by the Lakewood Board of Education this week.

50 painters were started to redecorate and varnish the interiors of all school buildings. They will work steady during the three-week vacation period, but their work will probably be hampered somewhat when school commences.

The sand donated by the city for Horace Mann school yard, is being spread, rolled and raked by eight CWA workers.

The school board also employed 10 additional clerical helpers to aid in getting caught up on filing, etc.

Maj. John Snead heads the committee that has charge of the CWA for the board and he says every effort is being made to secure additional projects so that more men may be placed back on a payroll through this federal governmental aid.

 

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66c:14

C. W. A.
(Citizens Voice Disapproval)
LAKEWOOD COURIER - December 21, 1933 p. 1

The first opposition to Lakewood's CWA projects was voiced at a rather hectic council meeting, Monday evening, when the citizens of Hilliard Road expressed their disapproval for the widening of the north side of their street from Warren Road, to Madison Avenue.

The large delegation of citizens were headed by C.W. Klauminzer and Mrs. Sading. They applauded Councilman Fahrenbach's motion to rescind the council's former action and discontinue the proposed project, but their applause paled into insignificance when compared with the mark of approval that was given City Engineer Fisher's address that followed.

Mr. Fisher pointed out that if the project were discontinued, it would mean that the men who had been employed on the project, would be immediately unemployed as they would be placed again at the bottom of the CWA list. He said that he for one did not have sufficient nerve to go up and face these men, and tell them that they were out of work again.

“Have you forgotten the World War?” he challenged, “the war of destruction of men and property, when you and I willingly made every type of sacrifice? We are in another war now, one to save families from starvation, and the American man's self respect. The foe is unseen, but the aim is the highest one to which civilization has ever aspired. And the President has asked for your support and help, even though it means a sacrifice.”

A compromise was finally effected, and Councilman Fahrenbach recinded his former motion, replacing it with one that called for a four-feet widening of the street on the north side, and requested the Mayor to make application for a four-feet widening on the south side as far as was possible without incurring a large expenditure. The original recommendation had called for a widening of seven feet all on the south side.

A number of other CWA projects were submitted by the mayor for the council's consideration for the first time. They included: Engineering and clerical help for the engineering department, 12 men; the painting of the outside and inside of all public buildings, with the cost of material estimated at $1600, 75 men; the landscaping and resetting of fence at the city dump in Lakewood Park, with an estimated cost of materials of $110, 12 men; the 17-foot widening of Madison Avenue, in front of Madison Park for parking purposes, cost of materials estimated at $660, 20 men; drilling shafts for extension of storm sewers to lake level at foot of Lakeland Avenue, Wilbert Road, and Nicholson.

 

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66c:15

CIVIL WORKS ADMINISTRATION
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1934 pp. 5-6

In November of 1933, the Federal Government instituted what was known as the Civil Works Administration program and because of this act of Congress a substantial allotment was made to Lakewood which permitted us to do a great deal of public work and make public improvements which we could not have done otherwise. The unfortunate feature of the Administration of the Civil Works program was that the amount allocated for the purchase of supplies and material was inadequate to proceed with the various improvements which should and could have been made. The City did not have funds to purchase material for some of the projects.

Beginning with November of 1933, and continuing during the year 1934, the following improvements were made, by the Civil Works Administration furnishing practically all of the labor and approximately 10%, and in some instances 12% of the cost of the material:

1. Grading and landscaping a portion of Lakewood Dump and moving the park fence towards the Lake, increasing the park space approximately one acre.
2. The installation of a new water line from the Detroit Avenue car-barns to the Sewage Disposal Plant.
3. Landscaping and draining the Incinerator grounds.
4. Elimination of the open ditch in Lakewood Park by installing a concrete culvert and filling up the ravine, thereby eliminating hazardous conditions and increasing park space.
5. Widening of Edgewater Drive 6 feet on the south side from Cove to Highland Avenues.
6. Removing underbrush and grading the grounds at the Sewage Disposal Plant property in Rocky River Valley.
7. The grading and cindering of Detroit Riverside and Cannon Alleys.
8. The trimming of street trees. This was not a complete and thorough trimming of trees, but we were successful in going over practically the entire City and trimming trees which required it the most.
9. The construction of three concrete tennis courts in Madison Park.
10. Widening of Hilliard Road on the north side from Warren Road to Madison Avenue 4 feet and on the south side from Victoria to Mars Avenue.
11. Widening of Woodward Avenue intersection at Detroit Avenue.
12. Widening of Franklin Boulevard 8 feet on the south side from Warren Road to Ridgewood Avenue and on the north side from Warren Road to Cohassett Avenue. This work is still in progress east of Cohassett Avenue.
13. Widening of Bunts Road 6 feet on the east side from Franklin Boulevard to Madison Avenue.
14. Widening of intersections at Mars, Lakeland and Northland Avenues, and Madison Avenue.
15. Widening the intersection of Mars Avenue at Detroit Avenue.

We still have a number of projects that were not approved because of the City not being in a position to purchase the necessary material; but we hope, during the year 1935, a number of these additional projects may be completed with no great expense to the City.

 

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66c:16-17

FEDERAL RELIEF PROJECTS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1935 pp. 5-6

The following is a brief report of some of the major activities during the year 1935.

Due to the very slight improvement in the economic conditions which resulted in a continued decrease of revenue from general taxes and other reduced revenue, it was necessary to continue the operation of the City on the reduced basis existing during the years 1933 and 1934. There was just a slight improvement in general conditions and because of the heavy reduction in salaries and wages to employees a small adjustment was made effective as of July 1st, 1935.

In November, 1933, the Federal Government instituted what was known as the Civil Works Administration program and a number of projects were submitted by the City of Lakewood, some of which were completed during the year 1934, others were carried over into 1935. Among those completed during the year 1935 were the following:

1.The painting of public buildings.
2.Pointing of brickwork on public buildings.
3.Four concrete tennis courts in Wagar Park.
4.Removal of the easterly driveway in Lakewood Park.
5.The construction of four additional sludge beds at the Sewage Disposal Plant.
6.Grading of Hospital grounds
7.The widening of 32 street intersections along Madison and Detroit Avenues.
8.Widening of Detroit avenue from St. Charles to Belle Avenues.
9.Widening of Bunts Road from Franklin Boulevard to Madison Avenue, west side.

Other projects started during the year 1935, but not completed are the following:

1. The construction of a combination bandstand and comfort station in Lakewood Park.
2. The repairing and relaying of public sidewalks.
3. The construction of 7 concrete tennis courts in Lakewood Park.
4. Drop manholes at Nicholson and the Lake Shore and at Wilbert Drive and
the Lake Shore.
5. Sloane Avenue repaving from West Clifton Boulevard to Rocky River Bridge.
6. Trimming of City trees.
7. The installation of storm sewers as follows:
Clifton Boulevard from West Clifton to Edwards Avenue.
Clifton Boulevard from Manor Park to Whippoorwill Drive.
North on Whippoorwill Drive to Lake Avenue.
East on Lake Avenue to Homewood Drive.
North on Homewood Drive to the Edgewater Interceptor Sewer.
Between Summit and Brockley Avenue on Lake Avenue.
Clarence Avenue from Franklin Boulevard to Detroit Avenue.

These projects were in progress on December 31, 1935; and we have the assurance of the W.P.A. that same will be completed by them.

A number of other projects have been approved and will be started early in 1936; principal among these is the widening of the intersections of 12 streets along Detroit and Madison Avenues which project completes the widening of the intersections of all streets along these two thoroughfares where such intersections could be widened. There are several instances where the tree lawn between the sidewalk and the curb is too narrow to permit any street widening.

The paving of Summit Court, Cliff Drive, Andrews Lane, St. Charles Lane, Detroit, Riverside and Cannon Alleys is, also, expected to be completed during 1936.

The construction of a drop manhole at the foot of Lakeland Avenue has been approved and probably will be completed during 1936.

Among projects submitted to the W.P.A. which have neither been approved or disapproved are the following:

1. The construction of a breakwater from the present breakwater to the westerly line of the Park.
2. The construction of a cell block and garage at the Police Station.
3. The construction of a municipal garage on the City's property on Berea Road.
4. Construction of a garage at Fire Station No. 1.
5. Construction of a swimming pool in Madison Park.
6. Repaving of bridge approach, Detroit Avenue to Sloane Avenue.

 

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66c:18

BOILER AND LAUNDRY BUILDING AT THE LAKEWOOD CITY HOSPITAL
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1935, p. 7

After the exchange of a mass of correspondence with P.W.A. officials, extending from March 18th to September 27th, we finally succeeded in obtaining a free grant from the Government for the construction of this building. This grant is in the amount of $36,400.00 or 45% of the cost of the improvement. The work in connection with this grant included the exchange of correspondence, the filling out of numerous blanks, preparation of plans, specifications and estimates and a number of trips to Columbus. Late in August of 1935, while not officially advised by letter, it was reported in the newspapers that our request had been declined. Upon receiving this information we immediately communicated with Mr. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, Senator Bulkley of the U.S. Senate, and others; and just prior to October 1st we received approval of our request. Because of the large amount of work still to be done we were unable to advertise for bids until early in November. This of course, delayed matters; and, upon the approval of the bids by the P.W.A. office, it was necessary to prepare contract documents in sextuplicate for each of the three contractors. Because of the extremely cold weather during the winter months, practically no work could be done except excavation. We expect that before fall of 1936, the new building will be completed, together with the installation of new boilers, laundry equipment, etc., which will be a wonderful improvement and will provide much needed space in the basement of the Hospital building where this equipment is now located. It is planned, as soon as the new building is occupied, to make some much needed improvements in the basement of the Hospital building itself.

 

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66c:19

W.P.A. PROJECTS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1936 p. 6

During the year 1935 a number of applications for W.P.A. projects were approved and work completed. Other projects were started and continued into 19360 Among the projects completed during the current year were the following:

1. Seven concrete tennis courts in Lakewood Park.
2. Four tennis courts in Wagar Park.
3. Band stand and comfort station in Lakewood Park.
4. Sloane Avenue repaving.
5. Bridge approach repaving.
6. Summit Court Paving.
7. Cliff Drive paving.
8. Widening of pavement of 12 streets at intersections along Detroit and Madison Avenues.
9. Storm sewers on Clifton Boulevard from West Clifton to Edward Avenue, Manor Park Avenue to Whippoorwill Drive; north on Whippoorwill Drive to Lake Avenue; east on Lake Avenue to Homewood Drive, north on Homewood Drive to Edgewater Drive; on Lake Avenue from Summit to Brockley Avenues; on Clarence Avenue from Detroit Avenue to Franklin Boulevard.
10. Grading, topsoiling and seeding of tree lawns where these sewers were installed was started but not completed because of weather conditions.
11. Painting of fire alarm boxes.
12. Painting of inside of refuse incinerator and sewage disposal plant.
13. The repair of sidewalks and trimming of street trees was continued during the year but not completed.
14. The construction of a drop manhole for storm sewer at Nicholson Avenue completed and those at Summit Avenue and Wilbert Road should be completed within sixty days after the end of the year.

W.P.A. Projects pending and nearly all approved, work to be started as soon as weather conditions permit:

1. Paving of Riverside Alley, Cannon Alley, Detroit Alley, Andrews Land, and St. Charles Lane.
2. Water mains in Andrews Lane, Estill Drive, West Shore Court and Arlington Road.
3. Sewer mains in Estill Drive, West Shore Court and Belle Avenue.
4. Painting inside of Fire Station No.1, refinishing floors Fire Station No.1, Court House and Council Chamber and City Hall.

Projects submitted to the W.P.A. which have not been approved or disapproved.

1. The construction of a breakwater at Lakewood Park
2. Enlargement and improvement of the Sewage Disposal Plant.
3. The construction of a cell block and garage at the Police Station.

 

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66c:20

BOILER AND LAUNDRY BUILDING AT THE LAKEWOOD CITY HOSPITAL
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1936 pp. 6-7

On December 17th, 1935, contracts for the construction and equipping of this building were approved by the P.W.A. officials in Columbus and work was started December 21st, 1935. Because of the severe weather early in 1936, the work progressed very slowly and the building could not be occupied until October 26,1936. New boilers and new laundry equipment were installed, and we find the operation of the equipment has materially reduced the operating expenses of both the boilers and the laundry.

We received $35,981.78 from the Federal Government as a free grant in connection with the construction and equipping of this building. It is true that because of this being a P.W.A. project the contracts were somewhat higher than they would have been under private construction; but the fact remains that the free grant from the Government was a substantial assistance.

The service at the Hospital during the year 1936 was greatly improved; but, because of lack of space and facilities, many patients were refused admission. To remedy this condition it is expected that a committee will be appointed in the very near future to make a survey for the purpose of determining what additional space and facilities are necessary to accommodate persons in need of hospitalization. Just what this survey will show and what additional improvements will be recommended has not been determined; but I am quite sure the people of Lakewood, after realizing the circumstances, will approve of an additional expenditure of money to provide the necessary facilities.

It has been stated Lakewood could hospitalize its people in other hospitals for less than at our own hospital. Experience proves this statement is not correct. Lakewood has a population of approximately 75,000 people and should have a hospital of sufficient capacity to care for its own people properly, as well as those from other communities needing this service.

Both of the Senior and Junior Woman's Boards and the physicians who use the Lakewood Hospital all have cooperated and by the careful management which has been exercised during the past year a decided improvement has been shown.

 

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66c:21

COSTS OF W.P .A. WORK (Estimated)
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1936 pp. 36-37

A serious effort was made to determine, if possible, the actual cost of work done in conjunction with the Federal Government. Due to the great amount of “red tape”, the wide spread of "paper work", the frequent changes in policy and method of work, and the lack of close co-ordination in the W.P.A. between the departments of planning, supplies, purchasing, cost accounting and auditing, it was impossible to obtain accurate reports of the amounts of money credited to the city and the amounts paid out by the Federal Government, in the determination of the actual final costs. It is therefore necessary in reporting costs to use the estimated costs, as set up in the original application, together with additional supplements.

Based on the best information available, the value of work done in 1936 is approximately as follows:

Federal Funds ------------------------$516,612.00
City Funds ---------------------------$124,601.00
Total Work ---------------------------$641,213.00

The total work done in 1935 and 1936 is approximate1y as follows:

Federal Funds ------------------------$546,956.00
City Funds ---------------------------$150,577.00
Total 1935 and 1936 ------------------$697,533.00

The work thus far approved for 1937 is approximately as follows:

Federal Funds ------------------------$ 74,608.00
City Funds ---------------------------$ 26,857.00
Total thus far for 1937 --------------$101,465.00

The city funds provided by bond issue were reinforced by gasoline tax and motor registration and the money from the latter sources was very largely returned to street work, for which the tax was originally collected.

For 1936, the city participation in Federal work represents about 19.4 percent of the total cost of the work. For 1935 and 1936, the city participation in Federal work represents 21.6 percent of the total cost of the work. The above represents a saving of approximately $38,000.00 over the average participation in W.P.A. due to the policy, early established, of making the city contribution in the form of material and equipment.

 

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66c:22

RELIEF LOAD ASSUMED BY LOCAL SUBDIVISIONS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1937 p. 6

The discontinuance of administration of relief by Cuyahoga County, of course placed an additional burden on the City because of the heavy relief needs. The County discontinued the administration of relief in all municipalities as of May 1st, 1937.

During the regular session of the Ninety-second General Assembly of the State of Ohio much effort was made to have the State provide funds for the purpose of financing relief in the political subdivisions; but, because of the attitude of the Governor, the General Assembly was unable to provide financial assistance to any appreciable extent; and the relief load had to be borne by the local subdivisions--which was accomplished only by reducing other essential public services. Later in the year additional attempts were made to have the General Assembly provide funds for relief purposes, but the aid sought was not obtained.

The cost to the City of Lakewood during the year 1937 for both direct and work relief was $40,015.07. On this basis and according to the present indications we do not anticipate much improvement in the relief problem during the year 1938. We have endeavored to furnish part-time employment to those who are physically able to work, instead of paying direct relief; and we believe this, together with paying cash instead of giving food orders, has improved the morale of persons who are in the unfortunate position of needing relief.

A special session of the General Assembly was called for November 29th, 1937, and was still in session on December 31st; no one can anticipate when the session will adjourn or what provisions will be made for financial assistance for relief purposes.

 

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66c:23

W.P.A. PROJECTS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1937 p. 6

During the year 1937 the City completed the following improvements which were submitted to and approved as W.P. A.. projects:

1. The installation of water mains in Andrews Lane, Estill Drive, West Shore Court and Arlington Road.
2. The installation of sewer mains in Estill Drive, West Shore Court, and Belle Avenue from Clifton Boulevard to Detroit Avenue.
3. Paving of Cannon Alley, Andrews Lane and St. Charles Lane.

In the fall of 1936 the City submitted applications for the construction of a breakwater at Lakewood Park and the enlargement and improvement of the sewage disposal plant as P.W.A. projects. Council authorized the issuance of bonds for the sponsor's contribution but in October of 1937 we were advised the applications had not been approved. Upon receipt of this information we communicated with the State Board of Health and with its assistance have again submitted the enlargement and improvement of the disposal plant as W. P. A. project--the outcome of which we are unable to report at this time.

The construction of a breakwater, of course, cannot be handled as a W.P.A. project; and it is possible Congress may appropriate additional funds for P.W.A. -- at which time it may be possible to renew our application for that improvement.

It is also proposed to submit additional applications for the construction of sewers in various parts of the City as W.P.A. projects as well as a retaining wall in Rocky River to prevent the erosion of the bank on the Lakewood side immediately south of Rocky River.

 

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66c:24

COSTS AND ACTIVITIES
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1938 p. 6

During the year 1937 the cost of both direct and work relief in the City of Lakewood was $40,015.07, while in 1938 this amount increased to $58,038.50 and the indications for any material improvement during the year 1939 is very unfavorable. On June 1st, 1938, the administration of relief was referred back to the City by the Cuyahoga County Relief Administration; and every possible effort was made to keep the cost of this item at the lowest possible minimum but because of the fluctuation in private business, P.W.A. and W.P.A. employment, the amount expended for poor relief purposes increased approximately $18,000.00.

Every effort has been made to furnish work relief for those physically able -- as we believe it is much better for the City and the client, both from a financial, physical and economical standpoint.

The General Assembly of the State of Ohio has endeavored to solve the relief problem in order to avoid the necessity of the local subdivisions bearing the entire cost; but at this time this entire question is on a more unsatisfactory basis than at any time since the depression of 1929. It is predicted that the relief problem will be solved during the sessions of the Ninety-Third General Assembly; but I fear the administration of and expenditure for relief will never be properly taken care of by the State as long as it can be forced on the local subdivisions. I hope my prediction may not prove correct; but experience indicates that such will be the case.

 

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66c:25

P.W.A. PROJECTS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1938 pp. 6-7

1. BREAKWATER

In the fall of 1936 the City had submitted an application for the construction of a breakwater at Lakewood Park. The City Council had authorized the issuance of bonds for the sponsor's contribution but in October, 1937, we were advised that the application had not been approved. Early in the year 1938 we were advised by P.W.A. that if the City was still interested in this project it was believed the project could be re-submitted and would probably be approved.

Action was taken immediately, the necessary legislation enacted and, finally on June 24th, 1938, we were officially advised that the project had been approved with a free Government grant of $39,466.00. Additional legislation was enacted, bids requested, contracts entered into and the project completed September 24th, 1938, at a total cost of $89,524.27 of which, as above stated, we received a free grant from the Government of $39,466.00. Based on the time required to fill the breakwaters previously built and which made approximately one acre of land, the new project will last the City approximately 25 years for dumping purposes and will make approximately 5 acres additional land in Lakewood Park.

2. MUNICIPAL GARAGE

For approximately three years the matter of constructing a municipal garage for housing all equipment of the streets, Water and Garbage Departments and to provide for railroad siding facilities in order that street repair materials,gasoline and other commodities might be purchased in carload lots has been under consideration. A building of this character would permit the City to have all of its equipment at one place and make large savings of money both in the matter of maintaining equipment and purchasing supplies.

When the annual appropriation was made for the year 1937, $45,000.00 was set aside although not appropriated for the purpose of building a municipal garage; but, because of differences of opinion among members of Council no further action was taken until July 18th, 1938, when the Council authorized the Mayor to file an application with the United States of America through the Federal Emergency Administration of Public Works for a free grant of 45% of the total cost and expense of constructing a municipal garage on land owned by the City of Lakewood on Berea Road. Plans were then prepared for not only a building sufficient to house the equipment but to provide space for the meter repair shop of the Water Department, and storage space for certain materials which must be kept under roof. The estimated cost of this proposed building was $70,000.00 and application was made to the Government for a grant of 45% or $31,500.00 Under date of September 12th, 1938, we were officially advised that a free grant of $31,500.00 had been approved. Legislation was then enacted and everything possible done to proceed with the work just as rapidly as possible; bids for the construction of the building were received and opened on October 17th, but, because of all bids being in excess of the amount available, all bids were rejected and the second bids were received and opened on November 12th, 1938, and the bid of the H.F. Juergens Company for $66,288 was accepted and actual construction started November 18th, 1938. It is expected that the building will be ready for occupancy about July 15th, 1939. The result of obtaining a free Federal grant gives the City a garage much larger than originally planned for an expenditure of approximately $10,000.00 less of the City's funds than originally planned.

 

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66c:26

W.P.A. PROJECTS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1938 pp. 7-8

1. SEWAGE DISPOSAL PLANT

In the fall of 1936 the City had submitted application for the enlargement and improvement of the sewage disposal plant as a P.W.A. project and Council authorized the issuance of bonds for the sponsor's contribution but in October of 1937 we were advised that the application had not been approved. Upon receipt of this information we communicated with the State Board of Health and with its assistance again submitted an application for this improvement as a W.P.A. Project. This was finally approved as a W.P.A. project, it being estimated that the entire improvement will cost approximately $150,000.00 of which the City's portion is $82,500.00. Work was started in October, 1938, and indications are that it will be completed about August 1st, 1939.

This improvement will give the City of Lakewood a modern, up-to-date plant with a capacity of 17 million gallons of sewage per day,whereas the normal capacity of the present plant is about 5 million gallons per day. This improvement includes two large sludge digestion tanks, covers for additional drying beds and the equipment to treat the sewage with chlorine.

2. RETAINING WALL-–ROCKY RIVER

For some years the action of Rocky River has caused erosion in Lincoln Park and the City has lost approximately 2 acres of land. This condition was constantly getting worse and in the summer of 1938 we made application to the Government, as a W.P.A. project, for the construction of a retaining wall approximately where the shore line of Rocky River was before erosion took place. This wall starts at the northerly end of the dike constructed by the Metropolitan Park Board and extends northerly 430 feet. It is expected that this improvement will be completed about July or August of 1939. It is deemed advisable to continue this wall to the Detroit Avenue Rocky River Bridge; but, because of lack of funds of the City of Lakewood, we have negotiated with the County of Cuyahoga and the Metropolitan Park Board and the present indications are that this addition will be approved as a W.P .A. project. If this is accomplished then there will not be any additional erosion and the City will gain more than 2 acres of land in Lincoln Park when all the space back of the wall is filled in.

3. SEWERS

Application was made for the construction of certain sewers as W.P.A. projects, such application having been approved and work started in 1938:

1. From Belle Avenue to Marlowe Avenue on the northerly side of Clifton Boulevard and southerly on Marlowe Avenue to within 175 feet of Detroit Avenue. This improvement will be completed early in 1939.
2. In Summit Avenue from Lake Erie to Detroit Avenue with the exception of some 500 feet which had been previously installed.
3. On the southerly side of Clifton Boulevard from Summit to Brockley Avenues with connections to both the Brockley and Cranford Avenue sewers. It is expected this improvement will be completed about May 1st, 1939.
4. The construction of a drop manhole at the foot of Webb Road-–completed.
5. Sewer in Webb Road from Lake Erie to Clifton Boulevard. This improvement will be completed about March 1st, 1939.
6.On Lake Road from Webb Road to the intersection of Lake and Clifton Roads at the westerly end of Clifton Park. It is questionable if this improvement will be completed in its entirety during the year 1939.

 

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66c:27

W.P.A. PROJECTS
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY OF LAKEWOOD - 1938 pp. 34-35

Additional W.P.A. work along with the regular work of the Permit Department, has kept the switchboard, which is located in this department, exceptionally busy. We have an average of 450 incoming, inter-department and outgoing calls each day.

The Information Desk is located in this department and it is our aim to take care of all inquiries received in a satisfactory manner, or to guide the customer to the proper department for further information.

One county W.P.A. Project working out of this department employs 15 girls, copying and filing building, electric, sewer, curb and plumbing permits. A permanent file is being made on cards from the records, and this work is verified in this department before permanent filing is done. We appreciate the value of this record which will date back to 1905, and have given whatever assistance was necessary.

A second project a Federal W.P.A. working in this office are compiling residential information. We have also assisted in this work as this will be a classification of the type, class and valuation of buildings.

 

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